Monday, September 19, 2011

Implications of the Palestinian initiative at the UN

Implications of the Palestinian initiative at the UN
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas said Friday he will ask the full recognition of a Palestinian state in the United Nations when the world body go this week, defying strong opposition from Israel and the U.S..

Here are some of the reasons behind the initiative has and some of its possible consequences.

WHY PALESTINIANS WANT TO GO TO UNITED NATIONS?
Abbas says that 20 years of peace talks sponsored by the United States have been for nothing and wants a UN vote to give the Palestinians statehood precious. However, the Palestinian leader acknowledged that negotiations with Israel will be necessary to bring this state to function properly.

To justify the measure, Palestinians point out that the success of a two-year plan, backed by the West, to create institutions ready to assume the status of state say they are finished.

The Palestinians want recognition with the 1967 borders. WHY?

The Palestinian Authority (PA) said that the creation of a steady state comprising the territories occupied by Israel in the 1967 war that Israel will not be able to still call the land "disputed". Instead, it becomes clear that it is an occupied land. Israel fears this would allow the Palestinians to take legal action before the International Criminal Court (ICC) against the estimated 500,000 Israelis living in East Jerusalem and the West Bank.

UN ADMITS HOW A NEW MEMBER STATE?


Countries seeking to join United Nations normally apply to the UN secretary general, what happens to the Security Council for review and vote. If the 15-nation council approved the membership application, go to the General Assembly for approval. An application for membership requires a majority of two thirds, or 129 votes, for approval.

A country can not join the United Nations unless both the Security Council and General Assembly approve your request.

PALESTINIANS COULD JOIN THE UN?

In theory, yes. But Washington has made clear it would veto the application, which means you have no chance to succeed. Even if the Palestinians achieve a majority of two thirds of the Assembly, would require the prior approval of the Security Council.

OPTION IS A STATUS OF "NON-MEMBER STATE"?


In addition to applying to become a full member state of the UN, the Palestinians could also try to raise its observer status to non-member state, like the Vatican. That status, UN envoys say, could be interpreted as an implicit recognition of the UN to the Palestinian state because the assembly would acknowledge that the Palestinians a real state control.

The advantage of this option is that only require a simple majority of the 193-nation General Assembly, not a two-thirds majority. Abbas said Friday that more than 126 recognized states and the state of Palestine, which means we probably win this vote easily.


WHAT ADVANTAGE WOULD IT BE?

Important addition to awarding the title of "State", diplomats say could allow the Palestinians to join the ICC, from which could present the legal cases against Israel by partial blockage of Gaza and the Jewish settlements.

Are there any disadvantages for the Palestinians?

There are potential dangers. For example, Israel could counterclaim to Palestinians in the ICC by missiles fired at them from Gaza, led by the Islamist group Hamas.

Some critics have warned of legal consequences for the Palestinians themselves, saying the move could jeopardize the rights of refugees in the Palestinian Diaspora and the status of the Organization for the Liberation of Palestine (PLO). Others have dismissed such arguments.

Also, the UN vote will not change things on the ground in the Palestinian territories - a fact that could further undermine the position of the Palestinian leadership when the situation calms down. Some Israelis have warned that the deception could inflate the violence against Israel and even spark a new Intifada. Palestinian officials have ruled that out.

WASHINGTON COULD PUNISH ISRAEL OR THE AP?

Israeli officials have suggested a number of possible measures, including limiting the travel privileges to the Palestinian leaders trying to leave the West Bank, to stop the transfer of vital tax revenues to the Palestinians and even to annex West Bank settlement blocs to try to evade ICC's legal. Some U.S. officials have warned it may cut its annual aid to the Palestinian Authority, which reaches 450 million dollars (about 326 million euros). It is not clear which apply these threats. Depriving the AP funds, for example, would involve a rapid collapse of financial services, leading to instability. In the case of a bankruptcy, some Palestinian leaders argue that the PA should hand over the keys of the great cities of the West Bank to Israel and say to pay for their occupation.

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